Because my brothers and sisters are so much older than me, they had to help my dad to care for me from the age of one year of age. One of my first ‘jobs’ was as a milk boy for my brother. I had to go to customer’s houses and ask them for money. I was maybe 7 years old, shy and withdrawn. After several months, it became easier and I got to know his customers and also realised that some of my fellow school-children lived in these houses. I didn’t want to do it at first. I had no idea that years later I would use the character-building experience to get into and succeed in sales.

Feel the Fear.

How hard can it be? ‘We read out loud in English lessons to the class-how hard can it be reading out loud to the school, it’s the same words?’ This is what I said to my classmates, when the school was asking if anyone would like to read in assembly, the daily gathering of the whole school.

I had Intelligent Ignorance, that is, I didn’t know what stage-fright was, that it was a thing.

As I saw my classmates giggling and wishing me to fail, I read out louder and louder the passage I had chosen but I was shaking so much, the lectern was rattling in front of my and every time I let go, to turn a page, I thought I was going to fall over.

But, I had chosen the subject, I had volunteered and THEY were all so frightened, no one else would do it. The passage I chose: Why the Babel fish proves the non-existence of god, from The Hitchhikers Guide to The Galaxy.

My legs were shaking that day, but because my whole class were too scared to do what Id done, I felt a sense of pride and success and this buoyed me to try more. If you face your fear, the death of fear is certain. Years later I read Susan Jeffers, Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway and realised how taking personal risks helps you to become empowered.